Dating while seperated

In the ideal case, the geologist will discover a single rock unit with a unique collection of easily observed attributes called a marker horizon that can be found at widely spaced localities.

Any feature, including colour variations, textures, fossil content, mineralogy, or any unusual combinations of these can be used.

Similarly, in geologic studies, vast quantities of information from widely spaced outcrops have to be integrated.

Some method of correlating rock units must be found.

Although with clever detective work many complex time sequences or relative ages can be deduced, the ability to show that objects at two separated sites were formed at the same time requires additional information.

The two approaches are often complementary, as when a sequence of occurrences in one context can be correlated with an absolute chronlogy elsewhere.

By mid-century the fossiliferous strata of Europe had been grouped into systems arrayed in chronological order.

A coin, vessel, or other common artifact could link two archaeological sites, but the possibility of recycling would have to be considered.

It should be emphasized that linking sites together is essential if the nature of an ancient society is to be understood, as the information at a single location may be relatively insignificant by itself.

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